Tag Archives: Alligator Years

Twinsmith Interview

Twinsmith will be in Albuquerque, NM, this Tuesday, March 24th, performing at Sister as the opening act for Cursive. They will be previewing new music from their forthcoming album, , on the Saddle Creek label; which, coincidentally, is based in their hometown of Omaha, Nebraska. This will be the first full-length release on Saddle Creek and their second overall. Their self-titled debut was released back in 2013 and, “Honesty,” a 7-inch single, was released on Saddle Creek.

twinsmith_heroTwinsmith is: Jordan Smith (vocals, guitar), Oliver Morgan (drums), Matt Regner (guitar, synths), and Bill Sharp (bass).

Twinsmith will be touring in the eastern half of the US for the majority of March. Before finishing in Wichita, KS, the band will showcase/perform at the SXSW Conference in Austin, TX.

Bassist Bill Sharp recently logged-on to his computer to answer a few questions.

GBMB: This will be your second full-length release.  What were the most important lessons gleaned from the first album that you have implemented in the writing and recording of this album?

BS: We had a different drummer play the drum tracks on the self-titled LP and Matt and Jordan tracked most of the bass parts. I was working a more-than-full-time job when we were recording, so I really see this as the first proper Twinsmith album. This time around, we were all able to contribute in the studio and we all had input throughout the entire process, which resulted in an album that is a lot more dynamic and at the same time feels like a more cohesive work when compared to the self-titled LP.

GBMB: As the release date draws nearer, which do you believe you will experience more of: excitement or anxiety?  How do you believe it will manifest?  What tricks have your learned to overcome and/or calm these emotions?

BS: We’ve been done with the recording of the album for a couple of months now and, I think I can speak for all of us when I say, we’re definitely more excited than anxious about getting these songs out to people in May and seeing how they react to them. We have a lot of fun playing these songs and I really think people are gonna have fun listening to them.

GBMB: Tell me the story/references behind the title “Alligator Years”.

BS: It has a lot of meanings, depending on whom you ask.  I read something that said the average lifespan of an alligator varies based on whether or not they’re in captivity. In the wild, an alligator’s lifespan is about the same as a human. Assuming they don’t die unnaturally, they can live to be 70-115 years old. In captivity, their lifespan is 30-50 years.  It’s a question of which kind of alligator years you want to live: 30-50 guaranteed years of safe, stagnant life? Or would you rather take your chances in the wild, where there’s greater risk, but greater potential?

GBMB: Let’s talk about your producers, Darner and Pettipoole.  What went into the decision to use these two as opposed to, say, self-producing?  What are the advantages/disadvantages to having another voice/ear in the studio?

BS: Luke Pettipoole had expressed interest in wanting to work with us, which sort of got the ball rolling. We were all familiar with his work with his band, The Envy Corps, and he’s a really sweet guy, so it was an easy choice for us to make. Brandon Darner, also of The Envy Corps, was more of a wild card. We knew of his credentials, working with Imagine Dragons and such, but didn’t know him personally. Luckily, he turned out to be a pretty cool guy and an asset in the studio.

As a producer, Luke kind of became the fifth member of the band, which was cool. He would toss out ideas on songs that we’d all sort of hit a wall with, and, then, the four of us would take those ideas and build upon them.  When we would have an idea for a specific sound, but didn’t know exactly how to achieve it, his wealth of technical knowledge took us everywhere we wanted to go, sonically. He was great to have around.

Stream the first track from the forthcoming Alligator Years:

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